Glenna Jennings : 5_01web.jpg
and perhaps in that strongbox
everything lay hidden

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_10.jpg
she forgot what was important and
fastened on little things

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_12.jpg
no traces were left
 

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_23.jpg

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_25.jpg

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_11.jpg

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_26.jpg
all that came out were some
incoherent sounds

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_27.jpg

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_18.jpg

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_13.jpg
Infinite sourdes of life for
the heart of the other

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_02.jpg

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_17.jpg
artificial terrors
 

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_14.jpg
Seven years
only seven years!

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_08.jpg

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_07.jpg
I killed them with an axe
 

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_06.jpg

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.

Glenna Jennings : 5_04.jpg

The cheerleader is an undeniably American symbol. Since the girls wrestled the organized 'yell squad' out of its all-male origins in 1923, women in matching short skirts have served as cultural icons in camps as disparate as School Spirit and Hetero-normativity. I 'came out' as a former cheerleader with a documentary series about the squad of my alma matter in 2003. Since then, I have continued to investigate the multiple significations of the cheerleader in various projects.

Raskolnikov is the first of these investigations that uses my own cultural artifact -- all the bodies in Raskolnikov are wearing my high school cheerleading uniform (a vintage of the late 80s variety) to enact a conflation of Crime and Punishment and my novella Granite, which retells Dostoevsky's novel from the semi-comedic viewpoint a cheerleader and her meth-addicted boyfriend.

The images in the photographic series are not meant to illustrate either text. Rather, these bodies of work exist in tandem intertextual universes. The original suite of 43 images was commissioned by the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities and curated by Fabian Cereijido. Raskolnikov has also been presented at The Orange County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Luis De Jesus Seminal Projects, LUI Velasquez, Tijuana and Barnsdall Gallery, LA.